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#1 Katie Scott

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 02:08 PM

So I just started reading a book called "Americana" which came out in 2003 (when I was in full baby mothering mode and was not reading).  It is all about American subcultures - which made think of our own subculture of scrapbooking

 

I love the introduction in which the author, Hampton Sides, writes of American-ness: 

 

"We're still a country living on the frontier, only the frontier today is less geographical than it is social.  Having pushed our physical borders, we're now pushing the boundaries of how we live and organize our lives, lighting out for uncharted territory.  This tendency is best seen in our knack for spawning subcultures of every strain and stripe.  .... Ours is a land of refined fanaticism.  Anything we might dream of doing, we can find a society of Americans who are already doing it, and doing it so intensely that they've organized their lives around it.  They buy the tools and toys.  They build up a circle of friends in the group.  They spend their vacations doing whatever the group does.   They slip into the subcultural lagoon, and by degrees of emotional and financial investment, they become submerged."

 

I would love to hear a show about the subculture of scrapbooking.

 

I'm thinking Stephanie Medley-Rath hasn't been on in a while and she studied sociology and the subculture of scrapbooking. 

 

Questions:

 

1. What keeps a subculture going?

 

2.  What happens when subcultures collide?  ie. scrapbooking / art journaling etc.

 

3. When does one start to call oneself (as we know from one of the recent shows - there are men too) a "scrapbooker"?

 

4.  The globalization / expansion of the scrapbooking subculture hobby and how it is different in different parts of the world - ie. Australia vs. South America vs. other countries where scrapbooking seems to be growing.

 

5.  Stories about friendships / relationships formed via scrapbooking.

 

6. In the book, the author starts out by telling a story about when he was in another country and someone said "Hey American..."  and he didn't want to get the street vendor sales pitch so he said "I'm not American, I'm from Finland." and the street vendor didn't believe him and followed him until the author admitted he was American and then they had a conversation about how the guy knew he was an American.  Stories about how you can pick a scrapbooker out of a crowd - ie. you might be a scrapbooker if ___________ (like the redneck meme).

 

 


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#2 ronaba

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 06:03 PM

I think of scrapbooking as a hobby.

 

Maybe because I live in NZ where there wouldn't be enough people scrapbooking to call it a subculture, I don't see it as a such, anymore than any other hobby.


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#3 ShortDrMom

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 03:38 PM

I love this idea! I also think it might be interesting to add to the discussion the question of how scrapbooking and memory keeping collide with the subculture of "artists." Because it seems to me that there is a divide, and yet when I take "artistic" classes I often see many similar elements between the two. Yet "artists" are very often clear to separate themselves from our "memory keepers" subculture.


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#4 stacyj

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 10:31 PM

Katie, 

 

I love this idea!

 

There is certainly room for everyone in scrapbooking and we know that there is lots of diversity, but there is also a culture and I think it would be a blast to talk about that and maybe even poke fun at ourselves a bit!


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#5 gabmc

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 04:45 AM

Sounds like a really interesting book!


Gab


#6 debbiehodge

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 06:36 AM

oh. yeah. I've often thought about subcultures, and how much I love this scrapbooking one now

 

I moved into the scrapbooking subculture it from another -- fiction writing. i had local writing groups and then I also went to writers' conferences where I could study with the "literary-writing famous." I made writing friends from away and then traveled for writing groups and we were all watching the literary journals and the rising stars. In fact, Caroline Preston, who wrote The Scrapbook of Frankie Pratt is a friend I met at the Bennington Writers Workshop, and when her book came out we connected and did a webinar together.

 

I'm going to Bar Harbor this weekend with two friends from those days -- one just got a scholarship to a retreat/workshop and when she todl me, I said YAY but realized I didn't even remember what VCFA stood for. The other is a poet who does lots of readings around New England, readings like the ones she and I went to 20 years ago, hoping we'd one day be on the program -- and now she is!!

 

It's going to be interesting dipping back into that old subculture this weekend---we're going to visit an old teacher in Northern Maine.

 

I find the existence of a scrapbooking subculture really comforting and the internet has made it even more so. This last week over at GIS, a member posted about recently moving and having no one to crop with --- and by the end of the day, she had plans to crop with Pixels & Co owner Gennifer Bursett that night!

 

And I can't even begin to tell you how much fun I had with Katie Scott when she came to my home last month. I felt like I'd known her for years because we have interests and friends in common via this subculture (and she's just crazy nice and fun).


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Debbie Hodge at Get It Scrapped

 

I've had the pleasure to be a guest on the Roundtable many times. Recent episodes are below and all of the episodes are linked up to PRT on my ABOUT page.

  • Paperclipping Roundtable 210 (camera vs memory)
  • Paperclipping Roundtable 202 (imperfect scrapbooking)
  • Paperclipping Roundtable 186 (scrapbooking Christmas stories)
  • Paperclipping Roundtable 176 (scrapbooking modern media)

#7 gabmc

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 04:37 PM

That's so cool Debbie ... I feel the same way - I feel like I know you even though we've never met in person and probably never will!


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Gab


#8 Noell

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 08:50 AM

I'm bumping this thread up because we haven't covered this topic. Feel free to add more thoughts, suggestions, questions, etc. :)


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#9 ShortDrMom

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 02:57 PM

It might be interesting to talk about subcultures within our own memory keeping group, too. For instance, a lot of people identify as "I'm just paper," or "I'm purely digital," or "I'm hybrid."  Another divide: whether you do Project Life or don't. What is it about us that makes us want to narrow ourselves down that way? It would be an interesting PRT discussion!

 


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#10 mshanhun

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Posted 26 May 2015 - 08:22 PM

I 'used' to be an artist. I read Australian Artist from cover to cover and painted in my spare time.

My grandmother was an artist, and though my digi pages are somewhat artistic no one looks at my pages and says this is art.

I find that even the craft world Scrapbooking doesn't quite jive.

My fellow crafters see it as work or something weighty. They were expressing guilt when I showed up with my baby books , PL or whatever that I end up bringing an old cross stitch instead! These ladies have become good friends over the years.

Scrapbooking for me is writing and art and photography. I wonder if I'd fit better with the photography crowd? But then I'm not a technical photographer. I can help them the photoshop though!!

Thankfully I found a local FB PL group (actually I am now running it with a friend) in Western Australia so we can meet up and just scrap without having to explain why and wherefore.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

:) Melissa
http://DigitalScrapbookingHQ.com

Guest on PRT224  New and Shiny - about novel uses for Project Life

Guest PRT238 - Yellow School Bus - about scrapbooking your homeschooling journey


#11 keely

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Posted 04 June 2015 - 08:49 PM

I think there are degrees of involvement in scrapbooking, as in any hobby or endeavor. Most of the people on the Paperclipping Forum are pretty invested in the scrapbooking subculture. However, I know a lot of scrapbookers who have never listened to a podcast, taken an online course, read a scrapbooking blog or watched a haul or process video. They are not familiar with scrapbooking "celebrities" unless they've noticed their names at Michael's. They've never heard of Scrapbook.com, Simonsaysstamp, or TwoPeas. But there is definitely a subculture immersed in all of these things and I love it!!!
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