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Curiosity Question About Writing


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#1 Melissa

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 06:05 AM

I was listening to a podcast yesterday, and the subject of writing came up in connection with scrapbooking, which prompted me to wonder:

 

How many of you would identify yourself as a writer? For those that do, how does writing and its place in your life influence or inform your scrapbooking?


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#2 Maplestock

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 07:45 AM

I looked up the dictionary definition of writer while pondering your question Melissa. It says, "someone who's work is to write books,poems, etc". It also says "someone who has written something".
It is not my work to write, but I have certainly written plenty.

I really enjoy writing. I used to write a lot of poetry and short stories and I keep a journal (though not daily). And I have recently started a blog about trying to get healthier through diet and exercise. I also wrote a piece that I read out at my mom's funeral service. So, I wouldn't call myself a writer, per se, but writing is a part of me for sure.

As to the connection between writing and scrapbooking, I think they are intertwined. Scrapbooking for me is storytelling, just like writing. Pictures can tell a great story. And I am all about journaling on my pages so that adds to it as well. Loosely defined, I would say there's a writer in every scrapbooker.

Good question. I'm curious, what was the podcast you were listening to, if you don't mind sharing?
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#3 Melissa

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 01:36 PM

Thank you for your reply, Maplestock. I would say, based on what you said, that you are a writer. And I agree with you that as scrapbookers, we are storytellers, which is a form of writer.

 

The podcast I was listening to is Scrap Gals, and I think the episode is called "Midori Memory Keeping." Really interesting stuff. I love how people are branching out into different forms of memory keeping, telling their stories.

 

I think it's so important.


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#4 nicolemann9

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 01:40 PM

Like @Maplestock pointed out, I agree that scrapbooking and writing are intertwined (for the most part - there are some people who scrapbook without journaling just for the creative process). However, I don't think I would identify myself as a writer.... but I also find the journaling or 'storytelling' part of scrapbooking to be my weak spot. At the same time... the reason I scrapbook is to tell stories and to have a written record of things. So it's a bit of a conflict, haha! I often find that I have a hard time expressing what I want to tell, and how I feel. (For example, I've probably edited this post about 6 times already, because I don't feel like I am expressing what I mean properly :mellow:)  I feel like a lot of my journaling is facts sometimes... who, what, where, when. Which is good to know, but I also want it to be more story and feelings than just the basic facts. I've been trying to incorporate that into my journaling lately. As with anything... I think it is just the practice of writing that will make it better. 

 

Last year I took Ali Edwards "31 More Things" class and thought that it helped me, and I really enjoyed it. (Sidenote - I think that class is on sale, or part of a bundle on Ali's site right now...?) As most scrappy people know, Ali's so great at the storytelling aspect of scrapbooking, so I've found taking her classes and subbing to her kits and having the classroom content that is included so helpful in pushing me to tell more stories vs. facts.


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#5 Melissa

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 01:44 PM

Nicole, thank you for sharing your insights, and I can relate to editing. I used to do that a lot more, but I've become more comfortable with my own writing and have allowed myself to let go of perfectionism in some areas of my life. I still struggle a lot with it, though.

 

I agree with you WHOLEHEARTEDLY that practice makes writing better and easier. I am a long time reader of Natalie Goldberg, and one of my favorite of her quotes is, "You are free to write the worst junk in America!" It really helps free me from that tendency to want to be perfect right out of the gate.


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#6 Maplestock

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 02:45 PM

Thank you for your reply, Maplestock. I would say, based on what you said, that you are a writer. And I agree with you that as scrapbookers, we are storytellers, which is a form of writer.

 

The podcast I was listening to is Scrap Gals, and I think the episode is called "Midori Memory Keeping." Really interesting stuff. I love how people are branching out into different forms of memory keeping, telling their stories.

 

I think it's so important.

Thanks, I will check out the podcast.  I love your quote in your other post.  Letting go of perfectionism is so freeing! And, I think that imperfections show a more interesting side - a better feeling as to who we are as a person which could be valuable to future generations reading our books.  Though I am prone to proof-reading everything but that's just who I am. 


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#7 Maplestock

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 02:52 PM

nicolemann9

"but I also find the journaling or 'storytelling' part of scrapbooking to be my weak spot"

 

Try not to stress about it, you are not alone... my best friend (and scrapbook buddy) and I have a conversation about this almost everytime we scrapbook together... it is all she can do to get the bare facts (date, place, names) on the page but almost never journals and would like to but is too self concious about her writing ability.  I keep trying to tell her that it is so important and I think she agrees but she struggles with it.  Like anything else, it takes time and effort but gets easier as you go.  Keep trying.


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#8 Teri H.

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 05:39 PM

I would call myself a writer, and my dream is to become an officially "published" one (book-wise). I'm also a devout journaler. I think it's my introspective nature that has kept my interest in scrapbooking so strong. I also have a deep passion for the importance in sharing our life stories. It helps me feel valued, and I hope my family feels the same.

 

I think writing and scrapbooking is intertwined, but mostly because it's a conscious intention for me to intertwine them. I think some scrapbookers scrapbook for artistic expression and/or "doing something with their photos" and that's totally fine. Maybe writing isn't as much a part of it for those people.


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#9 Melissa

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 05:44 PM

 I also have a deep passion for the importance in sharing our life stories.

 

I do, too. My mother had memory loss, and that meant that a good portion of our family's story was lost to history. The reality of that has definitely influenced my scrapbooking and journaling.


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#10 janygb143

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Posted 15 July 2016 - 08:05 PM

I would call myself a writer, but I hesitate because of the increased pressure to use proper grammar and write interesting things! Haha. I wanted to be a journalist when I was a kid. I've recently been going through decades' worth of my old papers (to KonMari), and that fact is totally obvious- I wrote SO much stuff (and saved it all)!! Writing definitely came before my interest in photography, but I think my scrapbooking now balances both. What an interesting question!
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#11 Melissa

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 07:22 AM

I would call myself a writer, but I hesitate because of the increased pressure to use proper grammar and write interesting things! Haha. I wanted to be a journalist when I was a kid. I've recently been going through decades' worth of my old papers (to KonMari), and that fact is totally obvious- I wrote SO much stuff (and saved it all)!! Writing definitely came before my interest in photography, but I think my scrapbooking now balances both. What an interesting question!

 

I think using proper grammar is important, but secondary to getting the writing done. I can't recall where I heard this, but someone said she doubted Anne Frank was worrying about grammar or spelling when she wrote her diary. The most important thing is to share your soul with the world, to tell your unique story. It IS interesting, just by virtue of being told.

 

I smiled when I read about your saving it all. Me, too. I have a huge box of writing I've done, some handwritten, some typed. Several scraps of paper with story ideas on it. I've also journaled since I was 14--we're not going to do the math on how long ago THAT was--and I've saved all my journals, finally organized by year, as well as all the looseleaf notes I wrote as journaling when I was in high school.


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#12 janygb143

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 10:22 AM

I smiled when I read about your saving it all. Me, too. I have a huge box of writing I've done, some handwritten, some typed. Several scraps of paper with story ideas on it. I've also journaled since I was 14--we're not going to do the math on how long ago THAT was--and I've saved all my journals, finally organized by year, as well as all the looseleaf notes I wrote as journaling when I was in high school.


What do you think you'll do with it all? I'm in the process of scanning everything, and trying to purge the bulk of it, but it's really hard for me to bring myself to get rid of some of the journals- including the cringe-worthy ones!! Is that weird? Lol
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#13 Maplestock

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 11:53 AM

What do you think you'll do with it all? I'm in the process of scanning everything, and trying to purge the bulk of it, but it's really hard for me to bring myself to get rid of some of the journals- including the cringe-worthy ones!! Is that weird? Lol

Wow! that's impressive you two!  I thought I saved a lot but I don't have that much stuff other than what I found that my mother had saved from my childhood - talk about cringe-worthy.  But it's interesting to think of how in the future people will be looking at digital images of our memories more than holding a perhaps yellowed age old piece of paper that was crisp and clean when we first used it. How times change.

I never did embrace the whole social media scene so I don't use Facebook or Instagram but as I mentioned in an earlier post, I now have begun a blog on Tumblr (agednotold.tumblr.com) because my daughter is helping me on a road to better health through diet and exercise and she felt it would be good for me to have a venue to write about it. She might have had an ulterior motive so I wouldnt direct my frustrations at her, just saying...).  Anyway, I wonder how much we do digitally will ever be read in the future as it all seems so "in the moment".  Again, changing times I guess.

Thanks for starting this thread Melissa, it is so interesting.


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#14 Noell

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 12:04 PM

I am a writer. Scrapbooking has always been for me a coming together of many things I love: writing, photography. and creative and visual art. Despite being a writer, my scrapbook journaling is far from perfect -- I am a writer who requires a lot of editing (some do, some don't) and I don't usually bother with editing or multiple drafts in my scrapbooks. 


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#15 Crayolaswap

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 12:12 PM

I used to actually want to be a writer... like of novels, when I was a teenager. However, in the context of scrapbooking I don't really consider myself a writer. It is an interesting question or perspective, though. I do think I have a bit more of a knack for written communication than average if I really try, but not to the level that would allow me to be a professional writer. An editor, perhaps.


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#16 Teri H.

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 03:47 PM

 

 

 I do think I have a bit more of a knack for written communication than average if I really try, but not to the level that would allow me to be a professional writer.

 

"A professional writer is an amateur who didn't quit." - Richard Bach  :D


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#17 MiaScraps

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 04:38 PM

Sure, I believe myself to be a writer. In the context as a writer of my stories and the stories I collect from family. My teachers at university often commented that I wrote very well. That was after a lot of editing! I throw that all out the window with my memory journaling. It's very much freestyling. A few years back I had an idea for a kids book. One of my friends came up with a clever title. I have yet to sit down to flesh that one out. Oh, I think about writing articles too. Or non-fiction books. I get ideas and then I get lazy.

Congratulations Maplestock on your blog! No bran flakes? I eat Alpen often. What would Kat say about that?
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#18 Melissa

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Posted 17 July 2016 - 07:03 AM

What do you think you'll do with it all? I'm in the process of scanning everything, and trying to purge the bulk of it, but it's really hard for me to bring myself to get rid of some of the journals- including the cringe-worthy ones!! Is that weird? Lol

No, it's not weird! I'm keeping all the journals. I don't have children to leave them (or the scrapbooks) to, so I don't know what will happen to them, but I read them periodically, and I refer to them for telling stories in scrapbooking.

 

The other writing stuff, the little bits of paper with story ideas and scraps of writing projects on them...I don't know. I won't keep them all, that is IF I ever make time to go through them. But a lot of it, I can't bring myself to get rid of. It's part of me! :)


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#19 Melissa

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Posted 17 July 2016 - 07:05 AM

Thanks for starting this thread Melissa, it is so interesting.

 

You're welcome. I'm enjoying it, too.



#20 Melissa

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Posted 17 July 2016 - 07:07 AM

I am a writer. Scrapbooking has always been for me a coming together of many things I love: writing, photography. and creative and visual art. Despite being a writer, my scrapbook journaling is far from perfect -- I am a writer who requires a lot of editing (some do, some don't) and I don't usually bother with editing or multiple drafts in my scrapbooks. 

That's how it is for me, too, Noell. My early scrapbooking, when I was first learning, had less journaling. When I look back at those pages, I don't connect to them as well as the ones I did with stories.






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