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Moving to Manual


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#1 L Squared

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Posted 23 December 2014 - 03:46 AM

I've had a DSLR for a couple of years now and I want to get serious about moving to manual mode in 2015. 
I know that a few sites have offered classes on the topic but it doesn't look like any are open for registration right now (capture your 365, big picture, clickin moms).

I'm wondering what resources - online tutorials, forums, paid classes - people would recommend & any other tips.



#2 Laura

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Posted 25 December 2014 - 09:57 PM

Maybe you can try Lynda.com? I know that site has lots of tutorials on lots of things. Maybe moving to manual is one of them?

 

Also, you can try CreativeLive.com. Lots of photography stuff there, too.

 

Good luck!



#3 janygb143

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Posted 26 December 2014 - 12:02 PM

I took a local class from a teacher-turned-photographer (Becky Higgins actually recommended her), and she really made it easy to understand (after years of trying to do it on my own). I'm in Arizona, so if you're nearby or visit, let me know and I can send you her info!

Otherwise, the book Exposure by Jeff Revell really helped me. I also have a copy of Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson, but I haven't been able to read much of it. I've heard it's really great. On my list to do for 2015!

#4 Kari_M

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Posted 24 January 2015 - 06:18 PM

I would highly recommend the book mentioned by janygb143 above......Understanding Exposure.  It will really help you make sense of how ISO, shutter speed and aperture all work together.  A must read as you make the shift to shooting on manual.  And I promise you, your photos will improve greatly once you make the shift from auto to manual.  Good luck!


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#5 wendyzine

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Posted 25 January 2015 - 12:31 PM

You might check Creative Live too. I think they have "mini" classes based on specific cameras. Otherwise, Katrina's classes are great. Maybe email her to find out when the next one will be offered?


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#6 yelppuppy

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 01:41 PM

Why do you want to move to manual? Shooting in manual doesn't make your photos better. There should be a reason why you have to do manual, for instance night photography or long exposure.

 

90% of the time I use Aperture priority (where I set the aperture) or sometimes shutter priority (where I set the time). Half of the time I manually adjust my ISO, and sometimes I manually adjust the exposure compensation (overexposed or underexposed). This approach is way faster than doing completely manual. If you think my approach sounds just like manual, notice that I always leave at least one element up to the camera, weather it's time or aperture. For example, if I want to do a fast shutter to capture my kids running, I couldn't care less what the camera's automatic setting is. If aperture is too large then I set the ISO higher.

 

All in all you just need to understand the relationship between Shutter, Aperture, ISO and Exposure Compensation. With these 4 things down you can really rely on camera's automatic setting plus your own tweak, which is much faster than manual. And these 4 things are easy to understand if you just google. I'm all for learning for free!


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#7 Ladydoc

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 08:24 AM

I'd recommend your local junior college, especially if you live in California (because education here, even with prices rising is quite affordable). Classes with assignments are very good ways to get the concepts. 


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#8 anandi

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 08:54 PM

Yep, echoing what @Ladydoc said, I took a 2 day class on the basics of DSLR photography at our local college and it was around $150 and was GREAT. A little heavy on the lecture vs. hands on, but tons of useful info that helped me on our Disney trip with capturing nighttime photos. 


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#9 Erica Hettwer

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Posted 22 February 2015 - 05:31 PM

Too bad Karen Russell's not teaching her class this year. It's amazing.

 

I'm going to respectfully disagree with yelppuppy.  My photos are much better since I switched to manual. I shot mostly in aperture priority for a couple years and was scared of manual. I thought it would take too long. But now, it's so fast for me and I love the results I get when I am the one making all the decisions. Cameras can sometimes make good choices but this is my photography, not my camera's.


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