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Pixels and Co. changes

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#1 ladywing

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 08:46 AM

Has anyone seen yet where the designers who sold at P&Co will be going with their personal use digital products? I was surprised at how many were leaving.


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#2 doglover

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 09:32 AM

I was really surprised by this!  I wonder what happened over there?



#3 bestcee

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 11:24 AM

Gossip says it went bad.

Mommyish posted they are opening a new store.
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#4 LeeAndra

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 08:43 PM

They will be going here:

 

http://www.thedigitalpress.co/


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#5 carrie

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 11:32 AM

The owner of P&Co. decided to change her business model and I don't think it was a fit for a lot of the designers. I'm excited about the change and new store... I think it'll offer the community a wider breath of choices. :) 


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#6 bestcee

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 01:59 PM

The owner of P&Co. decided to change her business model and I don't think it was a fit for a lot of the designers. I'm excited about the change and new store... I think it'll offer the community a wider breath of choices. :)

 

Where do you think the saturation point is? There has been at least one store that opened and closed this last year, and another that opened, but I don't hear anyone talking about it except one CT member for one designer there. We lost ScrapMatters almost a year ago. TwoPeasinaBucket had digi supplies, but then they got rid of them (and of course, have closed since).

 

I think different stores and competition can be good, but I also wonder if too many stores can be bad. I know there are some scrappers that will check out every store, or just follow certain designers to different stores. I used to check out 2 of the well known stores weekly, and another about bi weekly. I rarely checked out the other 4 -5 more well known stores. And then there are a ton of smaller stores that I check maybe once a year. Not because they are bad designers, but because I simply don't have the time.

 

I often wonder where the saturation point is? My town has a Hobby Lobby, Micheal's, Archivers and Jo-Ann's. We are down to only one independently owned Scrapbook store. We used to have more, but as Archivers moved in a few closed. Then Hobby Lobby moved in, and the rest (except one) closed. I think our city has a saturation point of 5. I realize that online is a factor here as well.

 

I think growth and change can be good, I wouldn't want our community getting stagnant. I just wonder how many stores the digi community can actually support. 


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#7 carrie

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 02:37 PM

That saturation is good point. And I think the answer is that it depends because saturation isn't the only key to staying power in this market. The industry isn't going to stay the same- paper or digi. There are companies that recognize that and companies that don't. I believe both ventures (P&Co and Digital Press) will be successful because I know that both companies will not just provide value and atmosphere to customers, but both site owners have the ability to show us what we didn't realize we needed- they are innovative and can embrace change.

 

Success is comprised of a lot things. It makes me think of restaurants... some open and are wildly successful... others are not. Since we're dealing in small businesses, it's hard to say what will succeed and what will fail. It's really hard to measure success by corporate giant standards and saturation points in digi. You're also dealing with a global marketplace and astronomical number of potential customers. What's the saturation point for everyone who takes photos on the internet?  


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#8 bestcee

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 02:46 PM

That saturation is good point. And I think the answer is that it depends because saturation isn't the only key to staying power in this market. The industry isn't going to stay the same- paper or digi. There are companies that recognize that and companies that don't. I believe both ventures (P&Co and Digital Press) will be successful because I know that both companies will not just provide value and atmosphere to customers, but both site owners have the ability to show us what we didn't realize we needed- they are innovative and can embrace change.

 

Success is comprised of a lot things. It makes me think of restaurants... some open and are wildly successful... others are not. Since we're dealing in small businesses, it's hard to say what will succeed and what will fail. It's really hard to measure success by corporate giant standards and saturation points in digi. You're also dealing with a global marketplace and astronomical number of potential customers. What's the saturation point for everyone who takes photos on the internet?  

True, but isn't there a quote somewhere that talks about how the most photographed generation will never see it? Because most of them are content to just let the photos be on their phones, or on their computers? I know Noell was talking about how scrapbooking isn't bringing in the younger generations. That they seem content to just let their photos hang out online, never to be thought of again (or something like that. I'm totally paraphrasing!)

 

I think it will be interesting to see what happens in the next few months. We have a lot of changes, and while change is a good thing, it can also have unexpected fall out. It will be interesting to see how it all falls out in the end.



#9 carrie

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 02:48 PM

I guess my main bullet point is that with the internet and the fact that everyone and there mother has some sort of camera and memories. The question we should be asking is how can take those people who aren't memory keeping and invite them into the hobby, instead of worrying about anything else, really. :) 


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#10 carrie

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 02:51 PM

I think we just said the same thing in different ways. lol

 

If kids can write a status update or keep a journal, then they can be memory keepers. They need a simple way to manage them both... and our industry needs a good app developer. LOL 


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#11 hclappy jen

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Posted 14 November 2014 - 09:41 AM

I wonder if the new business model will be subscriptions for PB&Co? I've seen that pop up with individual designers banding together to do subscriptions at TLP. And Gotta Pixel has had a subscription for years. But basing a whole site on subscriptions would be interesting. (This is rampant speculation on my part, I have no idea what's going on at PB&C).

 

I'm glad that the rate of store closings has at least slowed down. In 2012 it seemed like a store was closing every couple of months. Even if we're close to hitting the saturation point, I think it still leaves room for innovation. (Although browsing the PB&C forum this morning, most people are pretty wary of change)



#12 doglover

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Posted 15 November 2014 - 06:17 PM

I'd love to know the economics regarding being a digital designer.  It seems like so many of them stop designing. 



#13 bestcee

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Posted 15 November 2014 - 08:13 PM

I'd love to know the economics regarding being a digital designer.  It seems like so many of them stop designing. 

 

What do you mean by economics?

 

I know I've heard a few interviews with different designers talking about how much work it is, especially those that extract dainty and delicate items. Plus, most of the designers seem to put out a kit at least every two weeks, not to mention collaborations with other designers or store collabs or special events. And since the majority of designers have at least one other hat they wear - student, full time job, mom - and a lot started out as scrappers, I'm sure it gets overwhelming at some point. I know a recent designer that stopped stated life was too busy, and she didn't have time to keep designing.

 

I'm not sure the average price of kits across the board, it seems most are regularly priced between $6-7. And pretty much every store has them on sale the first week of release. Depending on how many you sell, and how long it took to create the kit, I would think you either need to love it, or sell a bunch in order to make it profitable and worth it. And there's the whole social media aspect that seems to be important now, so there must be a lot of balance between designing and life.

 

But I think it's also a cycle. Everywhere I look I can find examples of the old making way for the new.


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#14 wendyzine

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 12:20 PM

There is not one easy answer to the economics of the digital scrapbooking industry. Designers have different intents or goals with their businesses, as do different stores. Some are in it just because they love creating and sharing their art and they don't even care if they make money. Some enjoy the social aspect that they have with a store and creative team. Others strive to make enough money to support their own hobby, using any proceeds they get to put back into buying supplies for themselves. Others design to supplement income from other jobs and still others run their shops as a full-time business that their families rely on.

 

Within that, you have different levels of success, and different measuring sticks as well. There is so much involved and to some degree, the effort you put in is related to the success you achieve. But, there are many other factors as well and I've seen amazing designers come and go because they cannot make it work. Others get burnt out on the amount of work required for the payout received. Others seem to be able to throw anything together and be wildly successful. There is a lot you can do to build a solid foundation (much of which I detail in my ebook, An Insider's Guide to Designing), but once you hang your OPEN sign, you still cannot predict how much success you might achieve.

 

Beyond that, the industry continues to change as well. What was successful in the past may not be now and we have to change and grow and figure out how to adjust what we do to continue to meet out customer's needs and desires. This is my biggest challenge in 2014. It's a much tougher industry to be in now than it was a few years ago, and I think the number of stores that have closed and the number of designers that have retired reflect that.


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#15 LeeAndra

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 03:23 AM

I don't think most digital designers who exclusively sell digital product (as opposed to also creating for paper scrapbooking companies) make more than minimum wage once you factor in time, the cost of CU product (if applicable), the cost of technological equipment or graphic design programs, advertising/marketing, packaging/uploading/other backend duties to get product into a store, etc.


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#16 bestcee

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 12:52 PM

And since it seems to be a super secretive thing as to whether designers actually make money, the world may never know! :)

I'm guessing at least a few make more than minimum wage or they wouldn't stick it out. Plus, some of the programs they would have anyway as scrappers.

I know there was a time when everyone thought I have photoshop, I can design. I don't believe that's true, but I do think the start up fee compared to most industries is actually pretty low. The majority in our industry have a computer and the basics. Sure you can add more equipment - scanner, drawing tablet, etc. But when I read about designers equipment, a lot have the same as digital scrappers.
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#17 ladywing

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Posted 18 November 2014 - 10:25 AM

I think some of the P&Co designers were taken off guard by this. I just hope anyone who didn't download their product right away after iDSD can still get it. I think there is definitely a saturation point and it has caused stores to open, close etc on a pretty regular basis. People's lives change, the available time changes for designers too. Some of the stores have certain requirements for how many kits they do per month etc - same as the designers do have some requirements for the CT members and sometimes keeping up with that can be problematic for some.

 

I think we've seen the saturation in the paper industry by the contraction of companies. Some being bought by AC others just folding. Local stores are finding it difficult to compete with Hobby Lobby, Michael's and Joann's. Archivers is online only now. The advent of using a Silhouette to print and cut has people creating their own embellishments (again) instead of shopping product at the store but buying digital products to use instead. I think it's an entire shift in the industry overall.


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#18 wendyzine

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Posted 18 November 2014 - 11:53 AM

And since it seems to be a super secretive thing as to whether designers actually make money, the world may never know! :)

I'm guessing at least a few make more than minimum wage or they wouldn't stick it out. Plus, some of the programs they would have anyway as scrappers.

I know there was a time when everyone thought I have photoshop, I can design. I don't believe that's true, but I do think the start up fee compared to most industries is actually pretty low. The majority in our industry have a computer and the basics. Sure you can add more equipment - scanner, drawing tablet, etc. But when I read about designers equipment, a lot have the same as digital scrappers.

 

Times are tougher now than they were a few years ago, and I know there are lots of designers who do not make more than just supports their hobby. But there are enough of us that could not walk away without having a "replacement job."

 

And as for equipment, other than the Adobe Subscription, and some screen capture software, I have not invested in much more than scrappers might. The biggest expense, perhaps, is that I do upgrade my computer every 3 years, which isn't super often, but more often than most households, I think.


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#19 Rhoda Jayne

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Posted 29 November 2014 - 03:30 PM

Where did the 14 designers set up shop? I was looking at DST to see if I could find an announcement but didn't see anything. Thanks!



#20 bestcee

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Posted 29 November 2014 - 03:41 PM

The digital press.co
It just opened, and they've been having slowness issues.


On the other hand, did your see that p&co is adopting a subscription model?





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